Category Archives: depression

Coloring: Stress Relief & Creative Inspiration

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writer's coloring bookI recently saw an ad for Rachel Funk Heller’s, The Writer’s Coloring Book. If you click on the link to visit the website, it states: “Harness both sides of your writer’s brain with The Writer’s Coloring Book® and write better stories with less frustration.”

Donald Maass, author of Writing the Breakout Novel and founder of Donald Maass Literary Agency, said, “Rachel Funk Heller’s book doesn’t ask you to color between the lines. Instead, it gives you great worksheets and visual tools to draw your own unique story.”

I purchased the book in PDF format from the website for $10. However, if you can’t afford that (which I can’t, but you know…) you can find similar coloring pages with inspirational quotes by doing a simple search. Google “inspirational coloring pages for adults” or search Pinterest for “quote coloring pages printables.” Here’s one from ColoringShapes.com I plan to try: “Today is going to be awesome.”

The best part: coloring helps you deal with stress. Psychologist Gloria Martinez Ayala says, “When coloring, we activate different areas of our two cerebral hemispheres. The action involves both logic, by which we color forms, and creativity when mixing and matching colors.The relaxation that it provides lowers the activity of the amygdala, a basic part of our brain involved in controlling emotion that is affected by stress.” This isn’t new information, as Carl Jung was “one of the first psychologists to apply coloring as a relaxation technique.” (“Coloring Isn’t Just For Kinds. It Can Actually Help Adults Combat Stress,” Huffington Post)

So, take a break and color today! Then, come back here and let me know if it helped!

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Writer’s Paralysis

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Maybe you’ve been here. It’s more than just writer’s block. Maybe it started after the loss of a loved one. Maybe you were diagnosed with cancer. Maybe your child has pulled away from you to the point that you’re not sure they’ll ever come back. Usually, it takes something life-changing. Sometimes, it doesn’t. Maybe all this horrible news is depleting you. Maybe you’ve received too many rejections. Maybe you’ve just given up hope for anyone ever noticing your talent. Or, maybe you’re lost.

It’s okay. Now, reread what I just said. It. Is. Okay.

This is where you are. Here. Today. Now. You are going to stand up. You are going to put one foot out in front of you. (No, we’re not doing the Hokey Pokey.) You are going to begin to move. And you will keep moving forward.

Yes, the world will continue to swirl in all of its ugly and dangerous and beautiful and incomprehensible glory. Babies will be born and people will die. Wars will be fought and diseases will be cured. The hungry will eat and the rich will pay. You are here. Right now. In the middle of it all. Be in the world, but also above it. Take note of what you see and help where you can, but don’t become the pain. Rise out of it. You only have control over yourself. Others may hurt you. Others may love you. They may be selfish. They may save you. There will be days when you’re the luckiest person on earth. There will be days when nothing means anything, anyway. But you will be okay. And, when you are ready, you will write again.

Now, repeat after me: When I am ready, I will write again.

Now, go. Live.

Toxic Journals

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You just finished months of writing, editing, and perfecting this miraculous creation. Then comes time for submitting–a daunting task. You find lit mag listings on Poets & WritersDuotrope, or NewPages. You write a beautifully crafted letter and attach it with your poem/story/essay. Then, you wait–checking every five minutes for a reply, logging in to various submission managers, hoping to decode Submittable’s mysterious status of “In Progress.” You hope for the best, but know those rejections are going to come in like dirty, shameful children, one right after the next.

But, alas! Some wonderful journal wants your piece! Someone really read your work, and they actually enjoyed it! Now they even want to PUBLISH it!

Hold on, honey! Before you accept, read this article from The Review Review. It’ll give you warning signs to steer you from a bad publication.

Toxic Journals: What to Watch Out For When You Submit Your Writing (Robert Boucheron)

~ Jennifer

**Feel free to comment on your experiences with ‘toxic journals’ in the comments. We’ll all benefit from each others misery.**

 

Thanks for the Rejections

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Even the Greats receive countless rejections before they’re recognized as “great.” Stephen King, Sylvia Plath, Kurt Vonnegut and Gertrude Stein all used their rejections to drive them to keep working, and work harder. They didn’t let these stop them, and the world is better for it!

10 Painful Rejection Letters to Famous People Proving You Should NEVER Give Up Your Dreams (Distractify)

A Family in Grief: The Final Meeting with Fisher

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This is, by far, the most difficult article I’ve written. Of course, the majority of the words are Adriann Anderson’s. In her March 6 entry on her blog, “Fisher’s Journey Up the Mountain,” Adriann spoke directly to her infant son, Fisher, who died unexpectedly on Jan. 14, 2014. Adriann talks about Fisher’s tragic death and the steps she and husband, Ben, have taken to convince hospitals to change procedures that contributed to his death. This article is an adaptation of that entry, and a raw and honest look into the grief process of a Midwestern mother.

A Family in Grief: The Final Meeting with Fisher (Corydon Times-Republican, March 24, 2014)

Fisher Anderson